Operation Red Wings (Limited Edition) Ladies V-Neck Tee (100% DONATION TO NAVY SEAL FOUNDATION)
Operation Red Wings (Limited Edition) Ladies V-Neck Tee (100% DONATION TO NAVY SEAL FOUNDATION)
Operation Red Wings (Limited Edition) Ladies V-Neck Tee (100% DONATION TO NAVY SEAL FOUNDATION)

Operation Red Wings (Limited Edition) Ladies V-Neck Tee (100% DONATION TO NAVY SEAL FOUNDATION)

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RAA is a strong supporter of our Heroes and the Sacrifices that have been paid for us to live in Freedom. We will be donating of all profit made to the NAVY SEAL FOUNDATION from the sale of this Tribute Tee. RAA Will cover the cost of production of this one time limited run of this custom design. Once these all are all gone we will post up the final donation raised for the Navy Seal Foundation. STAND FOR SOMETHING... 

The annual U.S. Navy SEAL Danny Dietz Memorial Classic (USTRC Affiliate) and Bar-B-Q Cook Off weekend is held in Rosenberg, Texas at The Fort Bend County Fairgrounds. In 2009 event coordinator Danny Quinlan met Gunner's Mate 2nd Class (SEAL) Danny Dietz's wife, Patsy, at an event where she was speaking about her husband's life in the SEAL Teams and Operation Red Wings; where on June 28, 2005, four of America's most elite warriors were conducting a reconnaissance mission in the Hindu Kush of Afghanistan and came under fire, ultimately taking three of the four mens' lives. Mr. Quinlan approached Patsy with the idea of bringing together the exciting sport of team roping with the SEAL community in an effort to honor her husband. The action packed weekend of roping events, great music, Bar-B-Q CookOff, and the growing Car Show will be a great way for each of us to get out this Memorial Day Weekend to honor and remember our Fallen SEALs. Proceeds from the weekend's events benefit The Navy SEAL Foundation.

NON CLASSIFIED.

Operation Red Wings, informally referred to as Battle of Abbas Ghar (often incorrectly called "Operation Redwing" and/or "Operation Red Wing"),[was a combined / joint military operation during the War in Afghanistan in the Pech District of Afghanistan's Kunar Province, on the slopes of a mountain named Sawtalo Sar, approximately 20 miles west of Kunar's provincial capital of Asadabad, in late June through mid-July 2005. Operation Red Wings was intended to disrupt local anti-Coalition Militia (ACM) activity, thus contributing to regional stability and thereby facilitating the Afghani Parliament elections scheduled for September, 2005. At the time, anti-Coalition Militiaactivity in the region was carried out most notably by a small group led by a local man from Nangarhar ProvinceAhmad Shah, who had aspirations of regional Islamic fundamentalist prominence. He and his small group were among the primary targets of the operation.

The operation was conceived by the 2nd Battalion of the 3rd Marine Regiment (2/3) of the U.S. Marine Corps based on an operational model developed by 2/3's sister battalion, the 3rd Battalion of the 3rd Marine Regiment (3/3) which had preceded the 2nd Battalion in their combat deployment. It utilized special operations forces (SOF) units and assets, including members of the U.S. Navy SEALs and the U.S. Army Special Operations Command's 160th Special Operations Aviation Regiment (Airborne) (SOAR(A)), for the opening phase of the operation. A team of four Navy SEALs, tasked for surveillance and reconnaissance of a group of structures known to be used by Shah and his men, fell into an ambush by Shah and his group just hours after inserting into the area by fastrope from an MH-47 helicopter. Three of the four SEALs were killed and a quick reaction force helicopter sent in for their aid was shot down with a rocket propelled grenade fired from an RPG-7, killing all eight U.S. Navy SEALs and all eight U.S. Army Special Operations aviators on board.

The operation then became known as "Red Wings II" and lasted approximately three more weeks, during which time the bodies of the deceased SEALs and Army Special Operations aviators were recovered and the only surviving member of the initial team, Marcus Luttrell, was rescued. While the goal of the operation was partially achieved, Shah regrouped in Pakistan, and returned with more men and armament, aided by the notoriety he gained from the Red Wings ambush and helicopter shootdown. Several weeks later, Shah's group in Kunar Province was stricken to a point of inoperability and Shah was seriously wounded, during Operation Whalers, in August 2005.

Etymology

When the 2nd Battalion of the 3rd Marine Regiment (2/3) took the Stars model and developed the specifics of it, 2/3's operations officer, Major Thomas Wood, instructed an assistant operations officer, 1st Lieutenant Lance Seiffert, to compose a list of hockey team names. 2/3 would continue the use of hockey team names for large operations. The Seiffert list included ten teams, and the battalion settled on the fourth name on the list, "Red Wings," since the first three, New York RangersChicago Blackhawks, and New Jersey Devils, each could be misconstrued as a reference to military units currently in Afghanistan at the time.

The name has been widely mis-stated as "Operation Redwing" and sometimes "Operation Red Wing". This error began with the publication of the book Lone Survivor: The Eyewitness Account of Operation Redwing and the Lost Heroes of SEAL Team 10, which was written by Patrick Robinson based on unrecorded interviews with Marcus Luttrell.

RAA is a strong supporter of our Heores and the Sacrifices that have been paid for us to live in Freedom. We will be donating 100% of all funds raised to the NAVY SEAL FOUNDATION from the sale of this Tribute Tee. NOT PROFIT, but 100% of SALES. RAA Will cover the cost of production of filling of this one time limited run of this custom Design. Once these all all gone we will post up the final donation raised for the Navy Seal Foundation. STAND FOR SOMETHING... 

 UNCLASSIFIED.

Operation Red Wings, informally referred to as Battle of Abbas Ghar (often incorrectly called "Operation Redwing" and/or "Operation Red Wing"),[was a combined / joint military operation during the War in Afghanistan in the Pech District of Afghanistan's Kunar Province, on the slopes of a mountain named Sawtalo Sar, approximately 20 miles west of Kunar's provincial capital of Asadabad, in late June through mid-July 2005. Operation Red Wings was intended to disrupt local anti-Coalition Militia (ACM) activity, thus contributing to regional stability and thereby facilitating the Afghani Parliament elections scheduled for September, 2005. At the time, anti-Coalition Militiaactivity in the region was carried out most notably by a small group led by a local man from Nangarhar ProvinceAhmad Shah, who had aspirations of regional Islamic fundamentalist prominence. He and his small group were among the primary targets of the operation.

The operation was conceived by the 2nd Battalion of the 3rd Marine Regiment (2/3) of the U.S. Marine Corps based on an operational model developed by 2/3's sister battalion, the 3rd Battalion of the 3rd Marine Regiment (3/3) which had preceded the 2nd Battalion in their combat deployment. It utilized special operations forces (SOF) units and assets, including members of the U.S. Navy SEALs and the U.S. Army Special Operations Command's 160th Special Operations Aviation Regiment (Airborne) (SOAR(A)), for the opening phase of the operation. A team of four Navy SEALs, tasked for surveillance and reconnaissance of a group of structures known to be used by Shah and his men, fell into an ambush by Shah and his group just hours after inserting into the area by fastrope from an MH-47 helicopter. Three of the four SEALs were killed and a quick reaction force helicopter sent in for their aid was shot down with a rocket propelled grenade fired from an RPG-7, killing all eight U.S. Navy SEALs and all eight U.S. Army Special Operations aviators on board.

The operation then became known as "Red Wings II" and lasted approximately three more weeks, during which time the bodies of the deceased SEALs and Army Special Operations aviators were recovered and the only surviving member of the initial team, Marcus Luttrell, was rescued. While the goal of the operation was partially achieved, Shah regrouped in Pakistan, and returned with more men and armament, aided by the notoriety he gained from the Red Wings ambush and helicopter shootdown. Several weeks later, Shah's group in Kunar Province was stricken to a point of inoperability and Shah was seriously wounded, during Operation Whalers, in August 2005.

ETYMOLOGY

When the 2nd Battalion of the 3rd Marine Regiment (2/3) took the Stars model and developed the specifics of it, 2/3's operations officer, Major Thomas Wood, instructed an assistant operations officer, 1st Lieutenant Lance Seiffert, to compose a list of hockey team names. 2/3 would continue the use of hockey team names for large operations. The Seiffert list included ten teams, and the battalion settled on the fourth name on the list, "Red Wings," since the first three, New York RangersChicago Blackhawks, and New Jersey Devils, each could be misconstrued as a reference to military units currently in Afghanistan at the time.

The name has been widely mis-stated as "Operation Redwing" and sometimes "Operation Red Wing". This error began with the publication of the book Lone Survivor: The Eyewitness Account of Operation Redwing and the Lost Heroes of SEAL Team 10, which was written by Patrick Robinson based on unrecorded interviews with Marcus Luttrell.

2/3 eventually abandoned this naming convention out of sensitivity to the local population, instead opting for using Dari names for animals, including Pil (elephant) and Sorkh Khar (red donkey).

BACKGROUND AND DEVELOPMENT

SEALs prior to Operation Red Wings (L to R): Matthew Axelson, Daniel R. Healy, James Suh, Marcus Luttrell, Eric S. Patton, Michael P. Murphy

After the initial invasion of Afghanistan in 2001, U.S. military and coalition partner operations shifted from "kinetic" operations to those of a counterinsurgency (COIN) nature. One of the primary goals of the coalition by 2004 in Afghanistan was nation building, that is, providing a security environment conducive to the establishment and growth of a democratically elected government, as well as infrastructure support. A key milestone in this campaign would be the September 18, 2005 Afghan National Parliamentary Elections. While many of Afghanistan's provinces at this time had stable security environments, one of the most restive continued to be the Kunar Province, which lies in eastern Afghanistan, on the border with Pakistan. For election results to be seen as legitimate by the citizens of Afghanistan and the world at large, all elections throughout the country would need to proceed "unencumbered" – (without external influence, by either American and coalition forces or Taliban and anti-American and coalition forces), including those in Kunar. Insurgent activity in the Kunar Province during this time came from 22 identified groups, individual groups of which ranged in allegiance from those with tenuous ties to the Taliban and al Qaeda, to the majority that were little more than local criminals. These groups were collectively known as anti-coalition militia (ACM), and the common thread among all was a strong resistance to the unification of the country and subsequent increasing presence of national government entities in the Kunar, as these would pose a threat to their activities, be these activities attempting to aid a resurgent neo-Taliban, to lumber smuggling. With the goal of successful elections in Kunar, military operations in the area focused primarily on the disruption of ACM activity, and these military operations utilized a number of different units and operational constructs to achieve this goal.

PRECEDING OPERATIONS AND MODEL

The 3rd Battalion of the 3rd Marine Regiment (3/3), which deployed to Regional Command East (RC East) (which included the Kunar Province) in late 2004 to conduct stability and counterinsurgency operations in support of Operation Enduring Freedom, identified a number of operational barriers due to Special Operations Command doctrine for the battalion's counterinsurgency work in the area. These barriers included non-sharing of intelligence with the battalion and non-disclosure of impending raids by special operations units in the area. To mitigate these problems, 3/3's staff developed an operational model which integrated special operations forces units into their operations, allowing the sharing of intelligence between the battalion and special operations forces as well as maintaining solid operational control of operations with integrated special operations assets and units by the battalion. Operations that 3/3 conducted based on this model proved successful in disrupting ACM activity. The first of these, Operation Spurs (named after the San Antonio Spurs basketball team), conducted in February 2005, took place in the Korangal Valley, in the Kunar Province's Pech District. Spurs utilized Navy SEALs for the opening two phases of this five phase operation. Similar operations that followed included Operation Mavericks (named after the Dallas Mavericks basketball team), in April, 2005, and Operation Celtics (named after the Boston Celtics basketball team) in May 2005. These operations, all of which included Navy SEALs, were conceived and planned by the battalion, with the specifics of those phases involving Navy SEALs being planned by the SEALs. Each operation lasted between three and four weeks. 3/3 planned and executed approximately one of these operations per month, maintaining a consistent operational tempo.[ The culmination of 3/3's efforts was the April, 2005 forced surrender of a regional (and national) "high value" target, an ACM commander known as Najmudeen, who based his operations out of the Korangal Valley. With the surrender of Najmudeen, ACM activity in the region dropped significantly. Najmudeen's surrender, however, left a power vacuum in the region.

3/3 tracked a number of known ACM groups they determined to be possibly seeking to fill the power void in the region. The battalion began planning a new operation, tentatively called Operation Stars (which was named after the Dallas Stars professional hockey team (3/3's battalion commander, Lieutenant Colonel Norman Cooling, hailed from Texas, hence most operations being named after Texas sports teams)). Stars, like the other operations before it, focused on disrupting ACM activity, although due to Najmudeen's surrender, this activity had dropped and specific groups proved difficult to pinpoint. In May 2005, the Advanced Party of 3/3's sister battalion, the 2nd Battalion of the 3rd Marine Regiment (2/3) arrived in RC(E). Since before deploying to Afghanistan, 2/3's intelligence officer, Captain Scott Westerfield and his assistants, had been tracking a small cell led by a man named Ahmad Shah, based on intelligence sent back by 3/3's intelligence officer. Shah was from a remote region in Nangarhar Province, which borders the Kunar Province. Shah, they determined, was responsible for approximately 11 incidents against coalition forces and Government of Afghanistan entities, including small arms ambushes and improvised explosive device attacks. By June, 2005, 2/3 had relieved-in-place 3/3, and had taken the Stars concept and developed a comprehensive operation, an operation they called Operation Red Wings, with the goal of disrupting Anti-Coalition Militia Activity, with an emphasis on disrupting Ahmad Shah's activities, which were based near the summit of Sawtalo Sar.

PLANNING STAGES AND INTELLIGENCE GATHERING

A map of the area and plan relating to Operation Red Wings

2/3's battalion staff immediately began planning Operation Red Wings as soon as they arrived in Afghanistan. Lieutenant Colonel Andrew MacMannis, 2/3's battalion commander, and his staff, wanted to maintain the operational tempo set by 3/3. 2/3's Operations Officer, Major Thomas Wood, began planning Red Wings off the Stars base, which was a five phase operation. During this time, 2/3's Intelligence Officer, Captain Scott Westerfield, focused further on learning about Ahmad Shah. His overall intelligence picture of Shah took a substantial leap when 2nd Lieutenant Regan Turner, a platoon commander with 2/3's "Whiskey Company" – a Weapons Company augmented to function like an infantry line company, gathered a wealth of human intelligence about Shah during a patrol, including his full name: Ahmad Shah Dara-I-nur (Ahmad Shah of the Valley of the Enlightened ones); his birthplace, the Kuz Kunar District of Nangarhar Province; his primary alias: Ismael; his chief allegiance: Gulbuddin Hekmatyar, who was based out of the Shamshatoo Refugee Camp near Peshawar, Pakistan; his team's size: fifty to one hundred fighters; and his aspirations: to impede the upcoming elections and a


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